Getting Used to an Insulin Pump

Archive for the ‘About Me’ Category

Happy Christmas

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Hope everyone has had a really good day today.

Got the bestest presents, blood sugar a bit up and down… well, mainly up! But it is Christmas!!! ­čśë

See you in the new year.

Web-Monkey

xxx

Christmas is Coming

Oh Dear :-(

I Ate Too Much!

Well it’s less than two weeks until the big day…and when I say “the big day” I mean “the day where you stuff your face until you need a bit of a lie down”! Previously at Xmas I have had problems because as well as having a large meal…at least twice throughout the day…and alcohol…I have also never managed to resist the urge to snack between meals forgetting of course that I am Diabetic and therefore need extra insulin to cope with all the extra pummelling I am giving my poor stomach and digestive system.

However that was before I was on an insulin pump and knew quite so much about carbohydrate counting and how insulin is related to blood sugar and carbohydrate intake. Now I am fully conversed in ratios of insulin to blood sugar and carb’s, also “Mr Pumpy” (I’ve never actually found a decent name for him, still open to suggestions!) does a darned fine job of doing all the complicated calculations for me so all i really need to know now is that I have enough blood test sticks and how much carbohydrate is contained in whatever the next thing I am going to put in my face.

So…does that mean I am going to have a really well controlled seasonal feast this year?

Well, probably not. Getting the guestimates right takes years of practice and it gets a bit hard to remember what you’ve already eaten after the 4th mince pie so “I’m sure just one more won’t hurt” becomes a kind of self fulfilling pronouncement of blood sugar doom!

Unusually I am not heading down to Dorset this year to stay with my Parents, instead they are coming up to visit us so at least I will be in my own house surrounded by food I can easily calculate the carbohydrates of and without too many things that someone has made that I do not have easy access to the recipe for.

I do though feel a lot more confident this year and know that if I do have any wildly turbulent blood sugar episodes that at least after an hour or two I can be back on track and ready for another round of charades.

In Bruges

Choco Story - A Chocolate Museum

Choco Story - A Chocolate Museum

We spent last weekend in Bruges in Belgium, a really nice place with lots of history and architecture and chocolate, all of which were nice!

The holiday got off to a positive start although the young ‘un was a bit unsettled on the trip over. We went by train from Nottingham to St. Pancr(e)as to Brussels and then caught another train to Bruges itself. It was quite a long trip what with all the waiting around for connections, he was really well behaved though.

Things were fine until we got there and got settled in then I did a blood test and it turned out I was 19.6 mmol/l…Oh dear, the next couple were higher at 19.9 then 21.3, in the morning I tested three times between half six and half eight and didn’t get under 10 on any of them. This was when I decided I’d change my insulin, infusion set and cannula, the next test I did two hours later at 10:40 was 3.3 so I’m guessing my suspicion was right and something was up with some aspect of my pump or my insulin.

The next day went pretty well and with most of my results being around 6 then on Monday another good day, I put it down to eating ice cream and chocolates!

Funnily enough the 23rd (Tuesday) was also pretty good but I did have one test out of the ordinary at 17.4 while travelling on the train again, I was worried that the Eurostar was having some kind of negative effect on my pump but my worries were unfounded as the next couple of tests were around 4.

Yesterday was our first full day at home and I came to work, dropping the little ‘un off at nursery, I decided that I would be good and start redoing fasting blood glucose tests so I started at 12 o’ clock and got the following results:

6.9 mmol/l

6.9 mmol/l

6.0 mmol/l

5.3 mmol/l

6.7 mmol/l

7.1 mmol/l

I figure this is close enough to no change for me to leave it alone so I will do my morning tests again next and then something which I have been putting off and off which is night time.

I’m pretty certain I need to do these as I am having more insulin at night than I need for my supper in order to get my BMs about right in the morning, I think this means that at some point at night my blood sugar is going up and therefore I need more insulin, working this out shouldn’t be too hard it just requires that I get up through the night and do blood tests every couple of hours.

Anyway I’m signing off again now, sorry about my lack of communication recently but I’ve been doing some coursework for a thing I’ve been doing at work, however I’ve finished this now and therefore will hopefully get a bit of spare time back in order that I can start putting a few more updates on here again.

In the words of the Cat: “what is it?”

Insulin and Carbohydrate

What Happens to Carbohydrate with Insulin

Okay, I’ve had enough of what I’m meant to be doing at the moment and anywhere to get a drink or something to eat has shut so I thought I’d start on my A-Z of Diabetes, or at least trying to give a bit of background on what it is and what all the things I talk about mean so…

Type 1 Diabetes, also called Diabetes Mellitus is an autoimmune disease, that is it is a problem with your immune system, in my case I believe I got a virus of some sort when I was about 22 months old, my white blood cells killed off the virus but then didn’t know where to stop and decided that my beta cells in my pancreas were also BAD so they started destroying these as well!

Beta cells have a few roles but the most important of these (to a Type 1 Diabetic at least) is that they pump out insulin and (sort of) glucagon. Both of these hormones have an effect on carbohydrates, insulin turns carbohydrates in your blood stream in to energy which your body can then use to power itself, glucagon turns stored energy, e.g. fats, etc. in to energy if you don’t have enough carbohydrate in your blood stream when you need it.

Obviously you need energy to power pretty much anything you do, if you do not have enough then parts of your body can start malfuctioning! This is called “low blood sugar” or a “Hypo”. I have experienced a whole gamut of different types of hypo and personally find they tend to be different dependent on what I’m doing at the time, for instance if I am exercising, not necessarily full on cardio-vascular body pummeling, can be as low impact as walking (or more likely these days pushing a pushchair!) then I will tend to have a muscular hypo, that is some muscle group in my body, possibly all of them, won’t have enough energy and therefore I’ll get wobbly legs or arms or possibly collapse on the floor or else not be able to get out of a chair.

Worse for a number of reasons are hypos that occur when I am thinking hard, e.g. writing a document at work or doing a brain intensive DIY task, in these cases the organ in my body using the most energy is my brain and so when I run out of energy my brain ceases to function properly. The reason this is particularly bad is because my brain, being short of energy, is often unable to realise that it is short of energy and so I miss the signs I would normally pick up and just get lower and lower until (on occasion but not so much these days) I become unconscious, it can also cause bad moods, arguing (more than normal) and a general change in personality. If it is one of these ones the best thing to do is just to tell me it’s a good idea if I do a blood test, I might well argue but if I do too much you can just leave me until I collapse and then call an ambulance ­čÖé

So, because I am unable to produce my own insulin I need to somehow get insulin inside my body, over the years this has been by syringe and needle, plastic syringe, pen injector and most recently an insulin pump (hooray), all of these devices do pretty much the same thing but to different degrees of control, syringes were okay but you simply sucked up as much insulin as was required by eye and injected it, insulin pens were a bit better as you wound up the dose and it would give you the same dose, standardised, each time you wound it up on the pen so you knew you were getting exactly 10 units if that is what you selected. I’ll come to the pump in a minute!

Of course to control the level of insulin you are giving yourself you also need to find out how much carbohydrate is in your body, originally when I (in fact my Mum and Dad) had to do this you had to catch some urine in a test tube and add some water and a pill which would then change colour to give an indication of how “sugary” I was, e.g. whether I needed to exercise to try and bring my blood sugar down or if I needed to eat something, they were pretty much the only options available back in 1976. Then they bought out dextrostix, which were plastic sticks with a reactive piece of chemistry on the end which, again, changed colour when you wee’d on it, somewhat simpler and less prone to accidents or mistakes in the process. Nowadays I have a blood test monitor, this involves pricking my finger with a lancet to draw some blood, this blood then goes on to a strip, not a world away from the Diastix I used to use but plugged in to a machine which then gives a reading as to your blood sugar, this has a number of advantages!

The old Diastix used to have a number of colours for the different readings, I believe that “blue” meant your blood sugar was between 0 and 9 millimoles per litre (mmol/l the standard unit of measurement until fairly recently) green was between 9 and 12 (or something like that, it was a long time ago!) and then a range up to brown which was frankly much too sugary! Bearing in mind that a normal blood sugar is meant to be between 4 and 8 it obviously didn’t give a lot of fine control over your blood sugar. Also it meant whenever you wanted to test your blood sugar you needed to be able to pee…and find somewhere to pee! Finally because it takes a while for your body to process carbohydrate and eject it the tests were always about an hour or two behind where your body was currently at.

Blood tests are more or less instant, you still have to carry kit about with you but no longer need to find somewhere private to test and the results are to 0.1 mmol/l, in this way my average blood sugar results have come down from somewhere between 9 or 12 to about 7 these days which is obviously desirable and in fact makes me feel much better about myself.

So these days I need to do blood tests to check my blood sugar, guess the amount of carbohydrate in food I am eating and adjust my insulin accordingly (a bit more about insulin types another day).

The pump is a fantastic device, it is programmed with the amount of insulin I need to deal with 10 grams of carbohydrate (CHO) and the amount I need to bring my blood sugar down by 1mmol/l (0.3 units I think) and when my blood test monitor tells the pump what I am eating (which I program in to it) and what my blood sugar is it decides how much insulin to give me for the food and to adjust my blood sugar to the right level and then pumps it in to me! Technology is fantastic.

That’s it for now, gotta go. I’ll continue this another day, feel free to ask questions if you want more info about anything I’m talking about and remember these are my views and opinions and probably wrong on a number of counts!

Thirty One

One Month and Counting

One Month and Counting

Well I guess however you count it I’ve been on the pump for a full month now. So how am I feeling?

Pretty good actually! I’m still having a number of hypos and highs but they are getting less, and less extreme as the days go by and as I get better at the more specific carbohydrate counting that being on a pump means you have to carry out. I’m pretty sure that I have my morning (8am to 1pm) basal rate sorted out now, think I probably need to do one more fasting test for these to make sure and then I’ll start on the next ones (probably the afternoon in case you haven’t been reading these posts for long!).

I can now cope with most food-related situations and am slowly getting my head round how to manage exercise, although because I generally only go to volleyball practice once a week it means that working this out is slower than I would hope for, “maybe you should do more exercise” I hear you say, but with a (very nearly) one year old boy to look after I get plenty, just not the going to a sports club kind, and that doesn’t have quite the same effect on my metabolism.

So what am I hoping for next?

Obviously the basal rate thing is a pretty big one to work out but other than that I am just wanting to work out how to deal with unusual situations, e.g going out for a few drinks (which I honestly don’t do very often) or when my work regime is different to normal. I probably need to think about how my activity and food differs at the weekend too.

Do you feel normal again?

I really couldn’t answer that, having no recollection of what it was like to be normal because I got Diabetes before I was two years old. On the other hand I definitely feel different to how I did before, my hypo warning signs have changed and I have started to feel hungry and thirsty, rather than feeling low or sugary.

One final thing I wanted to say before I sign off for the weekend was that last night I got home after picking the little ‘un up from nursery, Deanne arrived back about ten minutes after me, got in the house gave him a cuddle, looked at me and said “you’re low, do a blood test” which I obediently did. I was 1.7 and had completely failed to realise! Which just goes to show that no matter how technologically marvellous your kit is and how many times a day you do blood tests it is still worth having people around who you trust and can rely on!

A Bit of History

Dan, Playing Guitar

When I used to be cool!

Hi, I’m Dan. I’ve created this blog on behalf of the Nottingham Type 1 Diabetes Group, who are a community of type 1 diabetics within (and around) Nottingham who decided that it would be a good idea to get together every so often and have a chat about things.

Personally I have had diabetes since I was 22 months old, at the time of writing that means 34 years and 8 months. Wow, that looks like quite a long time when you come to write it down.

I may publish a bit of history about my personal “journey” with diabetes at some point but for now I just wanted to get this blog started and let you know that in the first instance it is going to be a blog about my insulin pump (which I’ve had for four weeks now) and how I’m getting on with it. Therefore my first task is going to be to copy all the stuff I’ve written on the other sites, http://nottingham-type-1.diabetesukgroup.org and http://www.facebook.com/nottstype1 to this page and do a bit of decommisioning to get that stuff gone!

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